SedNet Conference 2015

9th International SedNet conference, 23-26 September 2015, Kraków, Poland

Solving societal challenges: working with sediments

Hosted and co-organized by:
Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection,
AGH University of Science and Technology

From 23-26 September 2015 the 9th International SedNet conference took place at AGH University in Krakow to which 130 sediment specialists participated from all over the world. In total 13 platform sessions, workshops and working group meetings were organised.

During the poster session, participants could vote for the best poster. The winners of the Poster Prizes are:

  • First prize (500 €):
    Dr. Jasmina Obhodas, Ruder Boškovic Institute, Croatia, with the poster “Bromine in the delta of the Neretva River environment and increased bladder cancer incidence” (for abstract see “4. Posters, miscellaneous issues, poster no. 32”).
  • Second prize (250 €):
    René Barth, Wiertsema & Partners, the Netherlands, with the poster “In-situ sediment measurements for field trial in the port of Delfzijl ‘Manoeuvring with negative UKC’” (for abstract see “4. Posters, miscellaneous issues, poster no. 39”).

To get a quick impression of the outcome of the event we refer to the slides of the “Wrap-up” session at the end of the conference.
For the abstracts of Presentations and Posters see the menu Downloads on this page. Pdf’s of most presentations can be found there too.
Miscellaneous session reports, and copies of abstracts and presentations can be found below:

 

Session “Sediment Quality and Perception”
Sediment quality and how society perceives it in terms of ecological and human health impacts may have a profound impact on sediment management strategies. This time the SedNet Conference welcomed approx. 30 contributions on sediment quality issues, from which 7 were platform presentations in the session “Sediment Quality and Perception”.

The session was opened by E. Szalinska with the case study of the Detroit River (North America), a large and complex riverine system located in the Canada and US border area. Sediment contamination problems at this transboundary site are well known since the 80’s and a substantial effort has been put into sediment remediation actions. Although recent studies show no real change in sediment contamination after remediation due to anthropogenic sources still being active, from a local perspective the river status is acceptable and the impact of sediment contamination on production and shipping services is negligible. The session continued with presentations from S. Heise and F.T. O’Shea addressing two potential sources of historic contaminants, namely floodplain backwaters of the Elbe River and historic landfills located in the inter-tidal zone within South-East England. According to the results presented by these authors, these contaminated sediments may become a secondary source of contamination under scenarios of climate change through their erosion and subsequent redistribution of contamination.

The important pressure of urban activities to sediment quality was also discussed. The study of multi-decadal records of endocrine-disrupting compounds in the Rhône River points to both urban and industrial activities in the greater Lyon area as the principal contributors to the historical and present concentrations of these compounds measured in river sediments (B. Mourier). From a different perspective, P. Spadaro and K. Cronin presented a method to evaluate the quality and significance of stormwater discharges in urban waterways, a source that may be perceived as secondary but may have a dramatic effect on the recontamination of previously remediated areas.

The session was closed by presentations on methodological developments in sediment quality and risk assessment. G. Breedveld discussed indicators of sediment variability connected to climatic conditions, which should help assessing the threads of release of natural and anthropogenic contaminants as a result of climate change, while J. Teuchies presented an exposure model to calculate changes in water and sediment concentrations in harbour environments. The use of such indicators and models should improve risk communication and understanding among stakeholders and ultimately facilitate the process of decision making in sediment management.

Session “Sediment in Historical and Recent Mining Areas”
It is well known that sediments and soils remain contaminated from mining activities even if these activities have been stopped since long. On the one hand, the immobilization of toxic metals such as mercury, cadmium, lead, zinc or copper is a welcome “service” of sediments. On the other hand, it has been proven over the years in many scientific studies that this immobilization may by far not be final and sediments may become a secondary source of pollution. The availability of contaminants depends on the environmental conditions which can change due to natural remobilization or human intervention. In the case of unacceptable risks management measures have to be taken.
In the session (1) was demonstrated the possible extent of historic and recent environmental pollution due to mining at the example of the Wisla and Odra catchments, Poland, (2) were presented the results of a comprehensive assessment of mercury loading, fate and transport within a mining impacted watershed in the California Coast Mountain Range, USA and (3) was suggested a field-based approach to linking biological responses of freshwater organisms to sediment contamination by metals using a large data set from England and Wales, UK.

A general conclusion from the session is that management decisions should be based on biotic response rather than on non-specific sediment quality standards. We need:

  • Generally, studies on the (bio)availability of the metals focusing both on physicochemical  aspects such as binding forms, fractionation, erodibility and organismic aspects such as uptake routes, bioaccumulation or food web magnification.
  • Studies relating sediment contamination to the response of organisms in the field.
  • Multiple lines of evidence studies to evaluate the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in watersheds considering both impacts on the ecosystem and on human health.

Session “Sediment Remediation and Uses”
The session “Sediment Remediation and Uses” was held on September 23. There were three interesting presentations on this theme. The first concerned the impact of ship propellers on the transport suspended sediment in harbors (Norway). This suspension of sediments transport phenomenon may be due to the anthropic activities (as is the case in the above subject), and can also be natural. The two other subjects justly concern the placement of sediment by different techniques in order to preserve natural resources and to ensure a continuous transfer of sediment.
One technique which had permit The US Army Corps of Engineers to modify management practices with respect to dredged sediment. More emphasis was being placed on utilizing these sediments as a resource that can be applied to land and habitat loss in a cost-effective manner.

The second technique is The ConSedTrans (Method-Continuous Sediment Transfer) with improved renewable power production. With the continuous sediment transfer method, sediments are taken from areas where they deposit unnatural to areas where the flow of the water is known to be big enough for quasi-natural transfer to the downstream area of the dams. There are three points close to dams that are possible:  the base outlet or a side outlet for sluicing (not the preferred option, due to losing water). The second is the intake area of hydropower plants and the third option is the intake area of hydropower screws. With transferring deposited sediments to hydropower screws, the specific weight of the sediments can contribute to an even higher renewable energy production. This electric energy can be used to sustainably support the transfer of sediments in the reservoirs and therefore keep the rivers and the reservoirs in sustainable balance.

Session “Understanding Sediment Fluxes and Budgets on a River Basin Scale”
In this session, seven knowledgeable and enthusiastic speakers presented the results of their studies on Sediment Fluxes and Budgets on River Basin Scale.

Christophe Peteuil of the Compagnie Nationale du Rhône presented a view on integrated and  cooperative management of fine sediment fluxes for the Upper Rhone River. He explained that as a consequence of man made changes in hydromorphology fine sediments can hamper the ecological functions of the river system. Sediment Management options for mitigating adverse effects on the (aquatic) ecology of the river system were investigated and evaluated. To tackle the problems it was decided to combine the options of sediment routing, ecofriendly flushing with a 3 year frequency and dredging.

Axel Winterscheid of the Federal Institute of Hydrology in Germany explained about the use of Multibeam Sonars for measuring (and understanding of) sediment fluxes in the period 2004 – 2014. The results of the study showed that Multibeam data helps to understand sediment fluxes. So upcoming sediment management activities may benefit from this study.

Rosalie Vandromme of BRGM, Orleans France, gave an overview of the project “Quantification of sediment fluxes in the Loire Hydrographic basin”. The purpose of the project is to examine the source to sink dynamics of the sediment cycle for the Loire River Basin. The results highlight that land management and lithology are the main factors that explain sediment fluxes.

Anne-Cécile Denis of the Institut Scientifique de Service Public and of the University of Liège, Belgium, elaborated on suspended sediment and contaminant transport monitoring in navigable and unnavigable waterways. The project aims to help develop tools for the assessment of suspended sediment quality in order to make a long term planning of dredging operations possible. Different sample methods were used and it became clear that the gathered data can be used to establish the relation between suspended load and water discharge and it is also possible to characterize the transport of pollutants associated with recent sediments.

Aleksandra Dewiszek of the University of Warsaw, Poland, presented the results of a literature study on the impact of the (massive) Three Gorges Dam on the sediment discharge of Yangtze River. Besides having an effect on the earth-rotation, the Three Gorges Dam also has a big impact on the sediment fluxes and budgets of the river system. Downstream of the TGD there is a abrupt gravel-sand transition. However also because of the scale of the study area, the identification and interpretation of hydrological and sedimentological changes in the Yangtze basin still is very complex.

Thorsten Hüsener of the Bundesanstalt für Wasserbau in Karlsruhe, Germany, explained the audience about the hydraulic and morphological model investigation of the river Oder along the Polish-German border. The aim of the study is the development of an updated river training concept (groine design, etc) providing evidence to meet the nominal depth requirements for shipping and at indicating different side effects of training measures such as increased high water levels. For this also a scale model of the Oder River under study was made and used for experiments. In 2014 the project was completed and an updated concept for a river training system was delivered.

Bram Ferket of the Antea Group Belgium presented a study on sediment fluxes to and in unnavigable waterways. The study was done for the Flemish Government and aimed at the development of a policy for sediment control in Flanders. Two models, one for soil erosion and one for sediment transport were combined. Model results showed that sediment fluxes and soil erosion are directly connected.  In the near future the model will be improved. A policy for sediment control still has to be developed and implemented.

When wrapping this up it must be concluded that in this very entertaining session a wide range of hydromorphological problems, mainly due to human interventions (e.g. hydropower dams, land-use), were highlighted on different scales. From very large Rivers to agricultural Ditches, and from the Mountains to the Sea. Field measurement methods were presented as well as modeling-methods both mathematical and physical (scale model).

Session “Building with Dredged Material and/or Sediments”
During the session “Building with Dredged Material and/or Sediments” speakers showed that hard work has been delivered over the last years (to decades) to improve the reuse of sediment and dredged materials in a wide range of applications. It was clearly shown that dredged material can be a valuable alternative resource and can be integrated into the circular economy.
The presented cases dealt with different approaches:

  • A management decision process of beneficial use of marine sediments in civil engineering practices, which was carried out within the framework of the CEAMaS project, was developed. Based on  (1) the legal framework (which varies over countries) and (2) the physical, chemical and mechanical properties, the system allows to select the most appropriate treatment process and reuse options.
  • In the framework of the “Sédimatériaux” approach in the Nord-Pas de Calais region a methodology was developed that allows to reuse dredged material taking into account the national regulations, and this in several sectors, some of which are rather recently introduced (like agricultural amendment, artificial aggregate).
  • For fine dam sediments in France a user-friendly decision support tool  to pre-select beneficial use was developed, based on relevant technical criteria and minimal characterization. This resulted in suitability indexes for six different beneficial uses.
  • In the project “Lift-up of Lowlands” dredged material was spread out in thin layers on the land adjacent to the waterways. This is an example of a cost effective and environmentally friendly way of reuse and was in addition integrated in watershed planning processes and regional strategies for sediment management.

The speakers have shown that reuse is evolving from exceptional to more common practice. And the research of a wide range of treatment and reuse options and development of decision support systems should inspire water/sediment managers and facilitate the path of reuse even more…

Special Session “Impact of Fine Sediments on Ecology”
The special session on fine sediment impacts on aquatic ecology was well attended. The presentations covered various aspects of characterising and mitigating fine sediment pressure on the aquatic environment, and developing new indices for aquatic biological response to those pressures. The combination of talks, questions and discussion point towards the impact of modern day catchment use on elevating fine sediment pressures on the aquatic environment,  the variable performance of mitigation measures in both space and time and the need to combine on-farm mitigation measures with channel restoration interventions for delivering greater impact / more sustained outcomes.

Special Session “Sediments in a Changing Environment”
With this special session, we wanted to raise interest in the topic of sediment properties and impacts that change when the environmental parameters are altered. In addition to physical and chemical properties, that can be affected when e.g. salinity, hydrodynamic conditions, pH, UV radiation, or oxygen concentration change, there are likely to be consequences for its ecosystem functions. This will especially be the case if the sediment is contaminated and bioavailability and toxicity are affected. Circumstances with the potential to change the environment for sediment can be natural regular processes, extreme events such as floods or anthropogenic activities. The diversity of drivers comprise e.g. climate change, river basin management and economic benefits.
In order to tackle this broad topic, SedNet intends to initiate 3 4-day workshops in the near future, that will focus on more specific aspects:
1)    “When sediment becomes soil and soil becomes sediment … “
2)    “Today’s importance of yesterday’s contaminants in rivers”
3)    “Sustainable sediment management in relation to climate change and safety”

These three topics were presented during the special session in Krakow, which then focussed on the first subject. Thirteen people attended the session, people with different backgrounds such as civil engineering, agronomy, marine and coastal engineering, biology, geochemistry etc. It became clear early in the discussion, that different disciplines had different perceptions of the difference between soil and sediment, that different definitions are around and – depending on the management issue – different classifications are followed.

Also diverse was the range of topics that participants thought should be tackled during the first workshop that is currently planned to take place in late spring 2016. As a practical way forward, it was decided to focus on a small number of management issues that foster the transition from soil to sediment and from sediment to soil, and within this scope identify and discuss those processes that we should know about and currently do not.
Some of these management issues had also been mentioned in talks during the conference, and comprise

  • Improvement of soil quality through sediment amendment.
  • Land disposal of dredged material
  • Agricultural impact after sediment deposition on land after floodings
  • Degradation of water quality when (contaminated) soil erodes and becomes river sediment

In order to facilitate the exchange among those that are interested in the topic of the work group and in participating in the workshops, we are organizing a LinkedIn discussion group called “sediments in a changing environment”. Everybody interested is kindly asked to look for the discussion group on the LinkedIn platform  and send a request for invitation.
On that platform, the following tasks will be addressed next:

  • Collection of current definitions on soil and sediment
  • Compiling a literature database and making this available
  • Preparation of a review on the topic of soil-sediment-soil by all interested participants of the work group which will serve as preparatory material for the workshop.

If you have any questions you can contact Susanne Heise, Susanne.heise@haw-hamburg.de

Special Session “How to build public trust for sediment management?”
Building trust with a broader public on complex issues is always a difficult challenge. At the same time finding ways to communicate with the relevant group of people on the right level is becoming more and more of an issue. The special session was designed around a recent case implemented at the Elbe estuary in Germany where sediment issues are of major relevance.
The session was opened by Adriaan Slob’s presentation on “Trust and Policy Processes”. Everywhere where people are collaborating, trust is an important carrier for that collaboration. More important, one has to understand that it is difficult to build trust but easy to lose it.

In a brief overview on the Elbe case, presented by Henrich Röper, it was shown, how a stakeholder involvement was conducted in a process that started in late 2013. A group comprised of 40 regional stakeholders (environmental NGOs, business representatives, Ministries, communities, fishery and tourism organizations) was discussing future options for sediment management, the role of sediment remediation and river engineering measures. Within 16 meetings more than 35 measures have been identified, discussed and assessed.

In an open discussion both presentations were discussed very lively by the 30 participants of the session. Among other issues the participants highlighted the role of university involvement, communication and transparency, availability of information, the importance of a common vision and the clarity of decision flow. It was obvious that the SedNet community has plenty of experiences to share on how to build public trust and will for sure continue to talk about “sediments and society matters” on future occasions.

Workshop Sediment Discharge Test
There was a lot of interest in the Sediment Discharge Test. Over 20 participants from 7 countries attended the workshop. The Sediment Discharge Test (SDT), consisting of an Excel-application and a Guidance Document, has been developed in The Netherlands by Rijkswaterstaat (RWS) and Deltares.
The SDT enables its user to assess the effect of an increase of chemical substances released from contaminated sediments due to a physical intervention on the chemical water quality objectives of the Water Framework Directive. This increase in “discharge” of substances may not lead to “deterioration” of the water quality. Deterioration, as defined by the Water Framework Directive, means that the water body may not deteriorate from one class (a good status) to a worse class (a bad status). The limit between these two classes is set by the water standard. The allowed discharge, whenever a water body has a good status, is therefore determined by the difference in the current water quality and the water standard. If a water body however has a bad status no deterioration is allowed at all. The way how the Dutch regulate discharges was of particulate interest to the participants.

Deltares and Rijkswaterstaat explained how the Excel application of the SDT may be used and what kind of data is necessary. The participants were pleased that the tool enables the user to enter any type of measurement. The tool recalculates the contents in the sediments or the concentration in the water phase to the right matrix. Besides, Deltares explained what kind of standards are used and how the participants may alter this for their own national standards.

All participants experienced the tool by executing some exercises for which three cases were designed. The participants thought the tool easy-to-use and already came up with a lot of ideas how to use the SDT in their own country. Some participants thought the SDT would contribute to determining the allowed quality of relocation sites for dredged material. Others would like to use the SDT in order to assess the impact of capping or remediation of certain parts of the sediment.

At this moment the test for “no deterioration” is only performed in the SDT if the sediment quality after the physical intervention is worse  than before and if this “new” sediment quality exceeds a test limit. For international purposes this test limit might be omitted, allowing to asses any kind of deterioration in sediment quality and its effect on the water quality. For the purpose of assessing the effect of an improvement of the sediment quality Rijkswaterstaat and Deltares will evaluate the possibilities and consider modifying the tool, since they are enthusiastic about applying the tool in this kind of situations.
Not only the participants were enthusiastic about the tool, Rijkswaterstaat and Deltares were very content about the input gained from the participants, so many thanks!
Download the SDT on: www.helpdeskwater.nl/sdt

Workshop on (re)Use of (Contaminated) Sediments
The topic of sediment contamination, and what kind of solution can be created with this material, has been discussed at SedNet from the beginning of the network in 2002. Many of the topics as described in the SedNet booklet “Contaminated Sediments in European River Basins” are still relevant. But there have also been changes in how we look at (contaminated) sediments as a problem versus a resource, especially with the definition of waste within the EU Waste Framework Directive (2008). Defining beneficial use applications to reach end-of-waste status of sediments has stimulated the development of a wide area of treatment and reuse techniques. In this workshop we reflected on the developments with regard to sediment use in Europe and the USA (leaving out ‘reuse’ and ‘contaminated’, stressing the potential benefits of sediment use) in the last 10 years. We also looked at the projects undertaken nowadays in Europe and the USA, where do they differ and what can be learned from each approach? To stimulate an active commitment from the workshop participants, there was an open floor for giving short (5-10 min.) presentations on sediment use solutions. This worked well, given the fact that four volunteers gave a presentation. As a consequence, little time was left for discussion on how to draft a whitepaper on sediment use, and how to stimulate governments to take the risk with the scientific community, NGO’s and service providers to really implement solutions for sediment use. We all share the belief that trucking around sediments over distances of thousands of kilometres before disposal is not a sustainable solution. We have to look at the local scale for the services that sediments can provide there, and the impact of alternative scenario’s (including the cost of doing nothing). This can justify some relative high cost treatment solutions on the site, producing high quality products for other uses. Or this can be a motivation to look at land use in relation to the overall water body quality, and reshape an area for maximal beneficial impact instead of focussing on meeting standards in a limited area. Therefore we conclude:

Ecosystem services + LCA = beneficial use of sediments

Posters
During the conference 40 posters were presented on miscellaneous sediment issues.
Two poster corners were dedicated to specific themes: 1) Sediment Management and 2) Polish issues.

The poster corner session around the topic “Sediment issues in Poland” was organized the 24th September around lunchtime. Seven posters were shortly presented by their authors related mainly (but not only) to sediment quality issues and metal pollution in particular. The case studies discussed at this time included the Sącz basins, the Oder River system, which still presents sediment metal concentrations that may pose a risk to the environment, and the Przemsza, a tributary of the Vistula River that flows through the highly industrialized Upper Silesia region and has strikingly high sediment metal concentrations. As pointed out during the discussion, metals appear as a priority compared to other types of contamination although little action has been taken so far at the sites at issue. Some options were discussed such as the textile tube dewatering, which potential to contribute to solve contaminated sediment problems in Poland was presented.

The poster corner was also a good platform to present the Polish case study for the project Soils2Sea, project financed by BONUS-185 (the International Programme for the Baltic Sea). Soils2Sea aims at reducing nutrient loadings from agricultural soils to the Baltic Sea via groundwater and streams. The contribution presented at SedNet was the Kocinka catchment, mainly agricultural, and the nutrient dynamics in water and sediments. The results should be used to model nutrient transport and ultimately inform potential management options that decrease the threat of eutrophication to the Baltic Sea.

For the information about the winners of poster prizes, we refer to the intro of this conference report.

Reacties uitgeschakeld voor SedNet Conference 2015

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Links

Belgium
TILES — Transnational and Integrated Long-term Marine Exploitation Strategies
long-term use of marine sands, in the framework of sediments in circular economy
EU Organizations
DG Environment
European Commission – Directorate-General Environment
EEA
European Environment Agency
EU–LIFE
Financial Instrument for the Environment
EU Water Framework Directive – integrated river basin management for Europe
Official EU site for the Water Framework Directive
European Union Law
The portal to European Union law
ICZM
Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) Program of the EU
Water Information System for Europe
Water policy in the European Union
Zero Pollution Stakeholder Platform
EU Projects
AQEM
Development and Testing of an Integrated Assessment System for the Ecological Quality of Streams and Rivers throughout Europe using Benthic Macroinvertebrates. EU contract EVK1-CT-1999-00027.
EUGRIS
European Groundwater and Contaminated Land Information System. EU contract EVK1-CT-2002-80021.
IMMERSE (Implementing Measures for Sustainable Estuaries) aims to accelerate the implementation of large-scale measures that address multiple estuary management challenges, while increasing their cost-efficiency and enhancing stakeholder commitment. The project is co-funded by the Interreg North Sea Region Programme.
INSPIRATION
INSPIRATION is funded by the European Horizon2020 programme. It is aimed at establishing a strategic research agenda on soil, land-use and land management in Europe.
LILAR – Living-Lab Rhine
The partners of the LILAR project will strengthen the cross-border efforts to measure sediment characteristics by collecting different measuring methods, organising a joint measurement campaign, analysing and discussing the results of the campaign in a cross border stakeholder workshop and sharing the results in a joint position paper. The paper will be disseminated amongst the relevant stakeholders in the Rhine region. A joint approach on measuring methods will thus contribute to the strengthening of overall German-Dutch river management.
MAPO European Marine Pollution Network
The project gathers a wide range of actors who are committed to sensibilizing and supporting innovative SMEs to take part to European projects/networks in the field of marine pollutions.
Narmena (NAture-based Remediation of MEtal pollutants in Nature Areas to increase water storage capacity). This LIFE project runs from 2019-2025.  
Paralia Nature
Large European ports are involved in expansion plans while at the same time they are located within or in proximity of protected nature. This causes dilemmas between economic development and nature conservation. The Paralia Nature project is meant for the exchange of experiences and information on the development of practical and applicable solutions regarding these dilemma’s.
PROMISCES (Preventing Recalcitrant Organic Mobile Industrial chemicalS for Circular Economy in the Soil-sediment-water system).
PROMISCES will identify how industrial pollution prevents the deployment of the circular economy (CE) in the EU and which strategies help overcome key bottlenecks to deliver the ambitions of the European Green Deal and Circular Economy Action Plan..
REFORM (REstoring rivers FOR effective catchment Management)
The final results of the FP7 project REFORM (REstoring rivers FOR effective catchment Management) are all available online. The project ended October 2015.
SIMONA – Sediment-quality Information, Monitoring and Assessment System to support transnational cooperation for joint Danube Basin water management
An INTERREG Transnational Danube Programme project.
SOLUTIONS
This EU project deals with a wide range of organic chemicals that are not (yet) listed as priority substances nor play any other role in the WFD.
Sullied Sediments
The aim of this INTERREG project is to enable regulators and water managers to make better decisions with regard to sediment management, removal and disposal, thereby reducing economic costs and the impact of pollutants on the environment.
SURICATES
An INTERREG project for finding new large scale solutions for sediment reuse in NWE ports, waterways and coastlines. Project started in 2017.
TIDE project of the Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme: integrated management of tidal rivers in the North Sea Region
VALSE project of the Interreg V France-Wallonia-Flanders: new transboundary means for the validation of scenarios for the valorisation of sediments and other materials
Germany
Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde
Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde (in German).
Bundesanstalt für Wasserbau
German Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute
Bundesumweltministerium
German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety.
Fachausschuss Baggergut
Fachausschuss Baggergut (in German).
Umwelt Online
German Environmental Legislation (in German).
Umweltbundesambt
German Federal Environmental Agency (in German).
Wasser- und Schifffahrtsverwaltung des Bundes (in German)
Wasserblick
German Information about EU-WFD (in German).
International organizations, Conventions
CEDA – Central Dredging Association
CEDA is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental, professional society serving Europe, Africa and the Middle-East.
Common Waddensea Secretariat
The Netherland, Germany and Denmark coordinate their activities and measures for a comprehensive protection of the Wadden Sea.
DANUBIUS-RI
The International Centre for Advanced Studies on River-Sea Systems.
DGE
Dutch-German Exchange on Dredged Material. DGE doesn’t have a website; alle DGE-publications can be found in the DGE Corner.
ECESP
European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform
ECSA
Estuarine & Coastal Sciences Association
ERN
European Rivers Network
ESPO
The European Sea Ports Organisation.
EuDA
European Dredging Association.
EuroGeoSurveysWho we are and what we do?
HELCOM
Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission
HydroSedinet
International network fostering collaboration between those involved in sediment management including hydropower companies, utilities, manufacturers, consulting firms, universities and research institutions, governmental agencies, NGOs and financial institutions.
IADC – International Association of Dredging Companies
Umbrella organisation of private dredging contractors.
IKSE
International Commission for the Protection of the Elbe
INBO
International Network of Basin Organizations.
International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine
Since 1950, the countries along the Rhine co-operate under the roof of the ICPR to jointly protect the Rhine.
International Maritime Organisation
The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is the specialised agency of the United Nations with responsibility for safety and security at sea and the prevention of marine pollution from ships.
IECA
International Erosion Control Association, a non-profit, member organization that provides education, resource information and business opportunities for professionals in the erosion and sediment control industry.
NICOLE
NICOLE is a leading forum on contaminated land management in Europe, promoting co-operation between industry, academia and service providers on the development of sustainable technologies.
NORMAN
Network of reference laboratories for monitoring of emerging environmental pollutants
OSPAR
Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic.
PIANC – International Navigation Association
The International Navigation Association (PIANC) is a worldwide non-political and non-profit making technical and scientific organization of private individuals, corporations and national governments.
See also PIANC’s Think Climate initiative “Navigating a Changing Climate Action Plan” Think Climate
Sediments Research Community
Web community for sediments research and management.
UNESCO-ISI
The International Sediment Initiative (ISI) is a global initiative to assess erosion and sediment transport to marine, lake or reservoir environments aimed at the creation of a holistic approach for the remediation and conservation of surface waters, closely linking science with policy and management needs.
WASER
World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.
Water JPI
Water challenges for a changing world.
Journals
Dredging news online
Marine Sand and Gravel Information Service.
JSS
Journal of Soils and Sediments.
Terra et Aqua
The official quarterly publication of IADC.
The Netherlands
Baggernet
Dutch Dredging Network (in Dutch).
Waterbodem
Information and news about sediments (in Dutch).
UK
The Broads Authority Sediment Management
The Broads Authority, as navigation authority, has adopted a river catchment approach to sediment management. The aim is to provide a means of ensuring the sustainable long-term management of sediment within the Broads.
The River Restoration Centre
A national information and advisory centre on all aspects of river restoration and enhancement, and sustainable river management.
USA and Canada
Environment Canada / Sediments
Environment Canada’s Internet resource for weather and environmental information.
Lower Passaic River Restoration Project
The Lower Passaic River Restoration Project begins with a study of the environmental conditions of the river. The study will produce a plan of action to achieve the goals of the Project.
Tomales Bay Watershed Council
California watershed council, an all stake holder and all agency problem solving group in Northern California 45 miles from San Francisco in Western Marin County.
US EPA Contaminated sediment in water
US Environtal Protection Agency, Contaminated sediment in water.
US EPA Great Lakes / Contaminated Sediments Program
US EPA Great Lakes Contaminated Sediments Program.
Various
EURODICAUTOM
European Terminology Database
Soil Erosion Site
The Soil Erosion Site is primarily an information gateway for soil erosion. It aims to bring together a wide variety of material relating to all aspects of soil erosion.

 

 

 

 

 

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6th meeting WG Sediments in Circular Economy

The 6th meeting of the SedNet WG “Sediments in Circular Economy” (WGCE6) was again held – due to COVID-19 – as a videoconference on the 24th of February 2022.

The agenda of the meeting was as followed:

1. Welcome and introduction for new members

  • Invite to introduce yourself (all new members)
  • CE steering group: Purpose of Sediment CE group
  • CE steering group: Recap, what did we do in the last 3 years?

2. Recent publications on sediment reuse by other sediment related groups (PIANC and CEDA)

  • Short summary on PIANC paper by Luca Sittoni
  • Short summary on CEDA paper by Arjan Wijdeveld 

3. Progress with regard to SedNet CE own white paper

  • Short summary on current status by Bruno Lemiere
  • What must be worked out by who?
    • Assigning team members to chapters
    • Contact person for each chapter
    • Discussion of new draft by the SedNet CE workgroup (when?)

4. INTERREG SIMONA project: Can we improve sediment sampling protocols in relation to assessing the reusability of sediment?

  • SIMONA project presentation by Gyozo Jordan
  • Possible contribution to CE white paper (Bruno Lemiere)
  • How to continue the SIMONA project results and best practice strategies on sediment sampling in current and new sediment reuse initiatives? (All Present)

Current and new initiatives undertaken by the participants (all present)

Next meeting, location and date, suggestions for site visit (assuming travel is possible in spring/summer)

Please find below the presentations used during the meeting and documents related to the meeting:

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Newsletter – February 2022

Website | Compiled by SedNet Secretariat | Subscription Service: SedNet SecretariatPrevious Issues

Disclaimer: SedNet is not responsible for faults due to incorrectness of info in this newsletter

This Newsletter contains the following items:
1. SedNet 20-year anniversary!
2. The Sednet Working Group on ” Sediment in a Circular Economy” is happy to invite you to its sixth meeting (WGCE6)
3. SedNet Pledge – Call for endorsers
4. WFD CIS Sediment document nearly there
5. Paper: ” Benthic Foraminifera as Environmental Indicators in the Mediterranean Marina Caves: A Review ”
6. Zero Pollution Stakeholder Platform
7. PROMISCES Project
8. SIMONA Project
9. NaCC Supporters Newsletter January 2022
10. Flyer for JNGCGC2020
11. SedNet Secretariat

Item 1. SedNet 20-year anniversary!

SedNet officially started as a European Commission funded project in the year 2002. Later this year we intend to mark our 20-years anniversary with something special, which we will keep as a surprise.

Venice, San Servolo island: the home base of SedNet in 2002-2004

And this is how it all started:

In April 2000 the GKSS Research Centre and the Technical University Hamburg-Harburg organized a workshop in Geesthacht in Germany on scientific aspects of evaluating and implementing bioassays into decision-making frameworks for dredged material management. As a spin-off from the workshop the idea was born to initiate the European Sediment Network SedNet. It was planned to be driven by stakeholder (port authorities, river quality managers) demands and to focus on the dissemination of knowledge, reviewing research needs (problem catalogue) as well as on applied research solving actual problems. 

In 2000 the European Commission launched a call for projects under their 5th Framework Program for research, technological development and demonstration. Proposals for establishing Thematic Networks were welcomed on the topic “Abatement of water pollution from contaminated land, landfills and sediments”. The proposal entitled “Demand driven, European sediment research network (acronym: SedNet)” addressed this topic and was evaluated positive and granted. The evaluation summary report on the SedNet proposal stated: “The proposal is innovative in that it focusses on sediments relevant on water quality and that it will treat the topic on a transboundary catchment scale. A strong point is that a common platform is suggested for problem owners, problem solvers and regulators. The project is clearly of European relevance (regarding community added value and contribution to EU policies). The project should be beneficial to the quality of life by enhancing water quality and minimizing environmental pollution. The project’s outcomes will contribute to EU technological progress by dissemination of optimal solutions to environmental issues. There are possibilities of co-ordination and complementary activities with other European networks, but this network should be kept as separate entity.”

The 3-year, European Commission funded SedNet project (EVK1-CT-2001-20002) started 1st of January 2002 and it had the following project summary: “Sediments mainly got local attention of water managers confronted with manmade sediment-traps, especially when associated contamination poses an environmental or human risk. More and more managers, port authorities and researchers express the need to exchange, at least at river basin level, these local experiences and to develop sediment management guidelines based on a multidisciplinary, coordinated and harmonized approach. Thus, opposing to the scattered responsibilities for sediment management and to the scattered development of knowledge. Due to the trans-boundary nature, no single water manager or country has the responsibility for solving sediment management problems at river basin level. SedNet will provide an international platform to facilitate information and knowledge exchange and to produce a joint document, containing recommendations and guidelines for integrated, sustainable management of sediment, from local to river basin level.” 

Between 2002 and 2004 more than 130 members subscribed to the network, simply by expressing their interest to the SedNet project coordinator to engage with SedNet. In that same period scientific, policy and management aspects of contaminated sediments and dredged material were addressed in 17 workshops and 3 conferences. Europe’s leading scientists and major sediment managers contributed to these activities.

The results were summarised in the SedNet booklet “Contaminated sediments in European River Basins”. The comprehensive results were published by Elsevier in four volumes in the book series “.

SedNet continued after 2004 as fully independent and self-supporting network aimed at incorporating sediment issues and knowledge into European strategies to support the achievement of a good environmental status and to develop new tools for sediment management. 

Item 2. The SedNet Working Group on ”Sediment in a Circular Economy” is happy to invite you to its sixth meeting (WGCE6)

For those of you who are not yet members, our objective is to continue and develop the exchange of information on Beneficial Uses of Sediments – same topic as the successful Circular Economy sessions of the recent SedNet conferences – and to hold as often as possible physical meetings with site visits of beneficial use case studies. We are also involved in the elaboration of a White paper on Circular Economy and Beneficial Use of Sediments.

The participation to WGCE is free of charge.

Please send an e-mail to the Secretariat to join and receive further news about this online working group meeting. 

Event Details
Location: Online
Date: 24-02-2022

From: 14:00 till 17:00 hours

Invite by the Sediment in a Circular economy steering group:

  • Arjan Wijdeveld
  • Julia Gebert
  • Dirk de Decker
  • Bruno Lemiere

Agenda

14:00 Welcome and introduction for new members

  • Invite to introduce yourself (all new members)
  • CE steering group: Purpose of Sediment CE group
  • CE steering group: Recap, what did we do in the last 3 years?

14:30 Recent publications on sediment reuse by other sediment related groups (PIANC and CEDA)

  • Short summary on PIANC paper by Luca Sittoni
  • Short summary on CEDA paper by Arjan Wijdeveld 

15:00 Progress with regard to SedNet CE own white paper

  • Short summary on current status by Bruno Lemiere
  • What must be worked out by who?
    • Assigning team members to chapters
    • Contact person for each chapter
    • Discussion of new draft by the SedNet CE workgroup (when?)

15:45  Break

16:00 INTERREG SIMONA project: Can we improve sediment sampling protocols in relation to assessing the reusability of sediment?

  • SIMONA project presentation by Gyozo Jordan
  • Possible contribution to CE white paper (Bruno Lemiere)
  • How to continue the SIMONA project results and best practice strategies on sediment sampling in current and new sediment reuse initiatives? (All Present)

16:30 Current and new initiatives undertaken by the participants (all present)

16:45 Next meeting, location and date, suggestions for site visit (assuming travel is possible in spring/summer)

17:00  Closure

Item 3. SedNet Pledge – Call for Endorsers

Already 34 companies have endorsed the COP26 Climate Change and Sediment Management Pledge. You can find the latest version here by clicking here on our website.

If you also want to endorse the Pledge, please contact the SedNet secretariat.

For more information please contact Jan Brooke.

Item 4. WFD CIS sediment document nearly there

The Water Framework Directive (WFD) Common Implementation Strategy (CIS) working group (WG) on Ecological Status (ECOSTAT) – see scheme – felt that there was a need to conduct further explorations of the possible sediment management aspects related to WFD implementation. As a result, ECOSTAT worked with SedNet on the joint organisation of an ECOSTAT sediment workshop on 1-2 April 2019 in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

The workshop brought together WFD experts, sediment experts, ecologists, regulators and stakeholder group representatives with the aim of exploring and acquiring information a.o. about why sediment management is of relevance to the WFD. The key ECOSTAT sediment workshop outcome was consensus amongst workshop participants that there is a clear need to provide further guidance on how both sediment quantity and quality should be managed to support the achievement of the WFD objectives. 

CISS SedNet

Following up on this need, ECOSTAT submitted a proposal to the WFD CIS SCG for the inclusion of sediment in the 2019-2021 ECOSTAT work programme and specifically for the drafting of a WFD CIS sediment document. That proposal was approved by the SCG and agreed that the decision about whether the document will be published as a CIS Guidance Document or as a Technical Report needs to be made by the SCG and the Water Directors. 

The drafting of the document began in mid-2020 involving the Member States, EFTA countries, and other stakeholders including SedNet steer group members and the European Commission. The final draft is ready now and is entitled “Integrated sediment management Guidelines and good practices in the context of the Water Framework Directive”. The document is sent for final consultation and approval first by WG ECOSTAT in their meeting 23-24 March 2022 and second by SCG (meeting date not yet panned). Thereafter the document will be made publicly available. 

Item 5. Paper: ” Benthic Foraminifera as Environmental Indicators in the Mediterranean Marina Caves: A Review ”

Recently there was a paper published on Geosciences related to “Benthic Foraminifera as Environmental Indicators in Mediterranean Marine Caves: A Review” 

Please click here to read the paper.

Item 6. Zero Pollution Stakeholder Platform

SedNet is selected to become member of the Zero Pollution Stakeholder Panel (ZPSP). On the 16th of December there was the high-level launch meeting with presence of a.o. Virginijus Sinkevičius, European Commissioner for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries as well as Apostolos Tzitzikostas, President of the European Committee of the Regions. Click here for the agenda of the meeting.

As SedNet delegated member in this panel Jos Brils was given the opportunity to make a 3 minutes statement on: 

•       Expectations on the role of the Zero Pollution Stakeholder Platform.

•  Suggestions for the work program 2022-2024 including contributions and commitments.

Please click here to read the statement.

For more information contact Jos Brils.

Item 7. PROMISCES Project

The project officially started on 1 November 2021 and the kick-off meeting was held in Paris on 15 and 16 November 2021. There were about 50 people in Paris and up to 60 people connected online.

This project is organized into the following technical work packages:

  • WP1 (led by Anne Togola, Brgm, France) – Analytical and toxicological developments and derived monitoring strategies .
  • WP2 (led by Hans Groot Deltares and Martine Bakker, RIVM, The Netherlands) – Fate, transport and exposure of PM(T) in the environment .
  • WP3 (led by Eric van Hullebusch, IPGP, France) – Zero-pollution solutions for soil-groundwater continuum and material cycles .
  • WP4 (led by Ulf Miehe, KWB, Germany) – Demonstrating solutions for zero pollution water cycles.
  • WP5 (led by Valeria Dulio, Ineris, France and Michiel Zjip, RIVM, The Netherlands) – Decision Support Framework for risk management of PM(T) in a circular economy.  

Please click here for the first press release. Click here for the overview of the letters of support.

For any additional request, you can contact Nicole Heine in charge of PROMISCES communication, dissemination and exploitation (WP6). More information on the project (abstract, partners) are available on this website or send an e-mail.

Item 8. SIMONA Project

Please click here for the presentation on SIMONA.

For more information, please contact Győző Jordán.

Item 9. NaCC Supporters Newsletter January 2022

Please click here for the latest NaCC (Navigating a Changing Climate) Newsletter. 
This is the first newsletter since the NaCC transferred from the oversight of PIANC to Resilience Shift.  

Please click here for more information about the NaCC

Item 10. Flyer for JNGCGC2022

Please click here for the flyer for French National days for Coastal & Civil Engineering.

Even if the flyer is written in French, all communications (and abstracts) can be written in English and the oral presentation also given in English.

Item 11. SedNet Secretariat

Marjan is on a well-deserved retirement. The secretariat is now run by Nan Su and Chayenne van Dijk since January 2022. If you want to contact the secretariat of SedNet, please send an e-mail to secretariat@sednet.orgIn order to get a better impression of the new secretariat of SedNet, please have a look at our previous enews.

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4th meeting WG Sediments in Circular Economy

4th meeting SedNet WG Sediments in Circular Economy: 15-16 April 2020

Due to Covid-19 this meeting was organised online in two sessions:

– 15 April – from 9 to 12 hrs Glasgow time (10 to 13 hrs for most others):
* PFAS and
* mass stabilization
– 16 April – 9 to 12 hrs Glasgow time (10 to 13 for most others):
* upcoming example projects

Summary meeting report
Twenty-one participants representing eleven countries took part in the web sessions to exchange collaborative ideas on Circular Economy (CE) practice and opportunities, and on two focus topics (1) stabilisation and beneficial use and (2) the PFAS problem in sediments).

Two group sessions were led on priority topics identified on WGCE2:

  • Beyond the initial “mass balance” approach to CE, need for defining ‘value’ to the ecological potential of sediment – and Incorporating CO2 and CH4 balance of sediment use in CE balance and funding, benefit or risk?
  • Setting up a synthetic catalogue of beneficial use options.

The outcome of WGCE3 session on “Clear definitions of concepts (beneficial use, valorisation, reuse, sustainability)” was validated.

A first draft of the WG white paper will be initiated with the outcome.

Future meetings are still uncertain with COVID-19 sanitary issues but according to travel possibility,

  • One will include both field visits (pilots, plants and workshops) and focus discussions,
  • The other one can be organised in live or web format, and comprise topic discussions, white paper and policy/RTD support documents elaboration.

Both may comprise project proposals workshops if the EU RTD agenda is favourable.

WGCE5 should be set up in October (7th and 8th) in Glasgow if travel is allowed, including site visits as expected for WGCE4.

WGCE6 will be organised in connexion with the SedNet 2021 conference in Lille. The invited talk by a USEPA Great Lakes National Program Office speaker on sediment remediation with beneficial use experience in the US should be on this opportunity, to ensure maximum audience.

 

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2nd meeting WG Sediments in Circular Economy

Working Group SedNet Circular Economy, 2nd Session April 2nd, 2019, Hotel Dubrovnik Palace, Croatia 

The 2nd session of the Working Group on Circular Economy and Sediments took place the day before the 11th SedNet conference. The WG-meeting was followed by a short joint session with the SedNet WG Sediment Quantity.
22 participants representing 9 countries were present.

The following was discussed during the meeting:

  • Outcome of the first session.
  • Which topics are missing yet in WGCE.
  • Feedback from PIANC, CEDA and other.
  • Proposition that the next WG meeting will be organised in an place where beneficial uses of sediment have been implemented (works, plant) or tested at the pilot scale. 
  • Proposition that the next WG meeting will have 3 separate subsessions for working on selected topics, and a shared wrap up.
  • Need for clear definitions of concepts (BU, valorisation, reuse, sustainability) discussed and validated by all participants. Lead: Julia Gebert
  • Beyond the initial “mass balance” approach to CE, need for defining ‘value’ to ecological potential of sediment. Lead: Arjan Wijdeveld
  • Need to incorporate CO2 and CH4 balance of sediment (old or fresh) use in CE balance and funding, benefit or risk? Lead: Arjan Wijdeveld.
  • List barriers to CE options for dredged sediments (economic value (Bruno Lemière), regulation bottlenecks (Arjan Wijdeveld), public perception.
  • Prepare texts together that can be used to support EU policy or can be incorporated in RTD call texts. On RTD support to EU regulatory issues (-> lead Arjan Wijdeveld), on circular economy objectives (-> lead Bruno Lemière).
  • Interest in setting up a synthetic catalogue of beneficial use options. To be initiated soon and fed by the CEDA incoming paper.  Proposition from Julia Gebert, Goedele Vanacker and Arjan Wijdeveld that the next WG should be held October 23-24 in or near Bremen, Germany, with a site visit to Delftzijl (Kleirijperij, see https://www.ecoshape.org/en/projects/clay-ripening-pilot-project/). Lead: Arjan Wijdeveld

General issues WG CE activities include:  – Exchanges and open discussions on beneficial use options, sustainability (environmental, social and economic benefits), how to take into account external benefits in the economic balance, find different ways to answer the question ‘How to convince policy makers’ ? Beneficial use should not be a goal in itself but a substitute to primary materials extraction, – Gathering information from other groups (CEDA, PIANC) and events (AquaConsoil), and cooperation opportunities,  – Submitting communication on good practice to the EU stakeholders platform on CE – Supporting RTD initiatives, especially trying to include Sediments topics in incoming Horizon, ERDF and Life call texts, and favouring the constitution of partnerships, – Connecting with SedNet “Sediment quantity” WG to exchange information and perspectives

Further topics will be addressed in the next meetings the WG. – Preparing our own “white paper” but first consolidating knowledge on CE – Preparing texts supporting RTD initiatives, especially trying to include Sediments topics in incoming Horizon, ERDF and Life call texts? – Preparing texts conveying the message to policymakers: Valorisation should be facilitated by regulations..

A presentation about METHA was given as keynote during the SedNet conference the next day, and discussed in WG CE too.  

Topics to be addressed in WG3:
The next WG will have 3 separate subsessions for working on selected topics, and a shared wrap up. A list of possible topics will be circulated with the extended minutes. Participants are kindly requested to select their preference(s). Further topics can be proposed for WG4, planned for early 2020. 

 

 

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Newsletter – May 2019

Website: www.SedNet.org
Compiled by: Marjan Euser (marjan.euser@deltares.nl)
Subscription Service: SedNet Secretariat (marjan.euser@deltares.nl)
Disclaimer: SedNet is not responsible for faults due to incorrectness of info in this newsletter
Previous issues: www.sednet.org/newsletter

Contents:

  • Looking back at the 11th International SedNet Conference
  • 2nd Session SedNet Working Group Sediments in Circular Economy
  • 3rd Session SedNet Working Group Sediment Quantity
  • New SedNet WG on Sediment Management Concepts & Education-Science-Policy Interfacing
  • Beneficial use of dredged sediments in road engineering
  • Sediment management guidance in support of the WFD
  • Emerging Contaminants
  • Microplastics in sediments
  • Dramatic decrease of sediment in Danube and Rhine
  • Implementing Measures for Sustainable Estuaries
  • Interreg EU Green Week
  • Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure
  • Upcoming events

 

Looking back at the 11th International SedNet Conference

From 3-5 April 2019 the 11th International SedNet Conference “Sediment as a dynamic natural resource – from catchment to open sea” was held in Dubrovnik, Croatia. Co-organisers were Ruđer Bošković Institute and University of Dubrovnik, and IAEA participated too in the organisation.

     

164 sediment professionals from 34 countries participated to the miscellaneous Conference Sessions, Poster Sessions and Special Sessions. Abstracts and slides of most presentations can be found in the library.

Winners of the Poster Prizes are:

1st Prize:

Nieves García de Blas (IETcc-CSIC, Spain)

Three 2nd Prizes:

The 12th International SedNet Conference will be held in 2021. We will keep you informed of the developments.

Photo impression SedNet Dubrovnik 2019:


More photo’s will be uploaded in the course of this summer.


2nd Session SedNet Working Group Sediments in Circular Economy

The 2nd session of the SedNet WG on Circular Economy and Sediments took place on 2 April, the day before the SedNet conference. It was followed by a short joint session with the WG Sediment Quantity. 22 participants attended the meeting.

WG CE activities include:

  • Exchanges and open discussions on beneficial use options, sustainability (environmental, social and economic benefits), how to take into account external benefits in the economic balance, find different ways to answer the question ‘How to convince policy makers’ ? Beneficial use should not be a goal in itself but a substitute to primary materials extraction,
  • Gathering information from other groups (CEDA, PIANC) and events (AquaConsoil), and cooperation opportunities,
  • Submitting communication on good practice to the EU stakeholders platform on CE
  • Supporting RTD initiatives, especially trying to include Sediments topics in incoming Horizon, ERDF and Life call texts, and favouring the constitution of partnerships,
  • Connecting with SedNet “Sediment quantity” WG to exchange information and perspectives

Further topics will be addressed at the upcoming sessions of the WG.

  • Preparing our own “white paper” but first consolidating knowledge on CE
  • Preparing texts supporting RTD initiatives, especially trying to include sediments topics in incoming Horizon, ERDF and Life call texts
  • Preparing texts conveying the message to policymakers: Valorisation should be facilitated by regulations

The next WG-meeting will be held at a place where beneficial uses of sediment are implemented (works, plant) or tested at the pilot scale. Preliminary date/venue: 23-24 October 2019, Bremen, Germany, with a site visit to Delfzijl, NL  (Kleirijperij, see https://www.ecoshape.org/en/projects/clay-ripening-pilot-project/).

This meeting will have 3 separate subsessions to facilitate working on selected topics, and a shared wrap up. A list of possible topics will be circulated to the WG-members with the extended minutes. Participants are kindly requested to select their preference(s). Further topics can be proposed for WG4, planned for early 2020.

If you are interested in joining this WG, please send an email to the SedNet Secretariat and we will add you to the WG-mailing list.

 

3rd Session SedNet Working Group Sediment Quantity

SedNet WG Sediment Quantity had its 3rd meeting prior to the conference in Dubrovnik.
Progress was made on the production of several WG-documents and further actions were discussed.
If you wish to get involved in the WG, and would like to receive the minutes of the meeting, please contact the SedNet Secretariat.

In the Joint Session of WG Sediment Quantity and WG Sediments in Circular Economy at the end of the afternoon, it was concluded that there is a certain overlap between the subjects of sediment continuum and circular economy. For instance, dredging can be (part of) a measure to influence the sediment budget and continuum, but beneficial re-use of dredged sediments is certainly a circular economic action.

After presentations about the activities of both WGs there was room for discussion. An interesting point of discussion was the use of the idea of sustainability. From a sediment quantity viewpoint, sustainability addresses the restoration of sediment fluxes in order to keep the system as it is or restore former conditions. From a dredging point of view, sustainability pertains to minimizing impacts, coasts, etc. Someone suggested that using the phrase ‘beneficial use of sediment’ might prevent misunderstanding.

 

New SedNet WG on Sediment Management Concepts & Education-Science-Policy Interfacing

One of the conclusions from the SedNet Conference Session “Sediment Management Concept and Sediment Policy” is that there is a need to share experiences in this field and to develop a SMC Guidance Document. SedNet would like to facilitate this process and has the intention to start a thematic Working Group. Kick-off meeting will be on Wednesday 20 November, starting around noon, ending 21 November around noon. Venue: IETcc-CSIC in Madrid, Spain. If you are interested in getting involved, please contact the SedNet Secretariat.


Beneficial use of dredged sediments in road engineering

This Methodological Guide presents how dredged sediments can be beneficially used in road engineering with a view to sustainable development and to the protection of the environment and of populations. This is the result of research carried out by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (DGCE) at the School of Mines of Douai for more than ten years on the theme of using dredged sediments. It is coherent with French regulations and the methodological framework (ADEME, 2010; SETRA, 2011) that prevailed at the time of the work. The proposed methodology was developed by the Ecole des Mines de Douai as part of France’s SEDIMATERIAUX project and may be reviewed in the light of feedback received at the French national or European level.

SedNet promotes since 2004 beneficial uses of dredged sediments, in a perspective of sustainable development and of circular economy. Road engineering is one of these beneficial uses, as it reduces both waste and mineral extraction.

This guide is not intended for use of sediments abstracted from a river system. It is only intended for harbour and canal dredgings, where restitution to river systems is usually not possible – at least economically.

Otherwise, it should be first considered to reintroduce them where the river system may need them, before considering any engineering use.


Sediment management guidance in support of the WFD

Preceding the 11th SedNet conference, on Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 April SedNet co-organized in Dubrovnik a sediment management workshop for and with the WFD CIS (Common Implementation Strategy) working group ECOSTAT (Ecological status). There were 45 participants from 16 European states and from Turkey. Outcome of the workshop was that the participants unanimously agreed to develop guidance on how sediment management can help to achieve the WFD as well as how this links to other EU policies (MSFD, MSPD, FD, CAP and Nature, Energy and Transport policies): sediment management is an issue that cross-cuts through all these policies, while the WFD (and MSFD and FD) is the core-policy. ECOSTAT takes the lead in developing the guidance and asked SedNet and national experts to bring in their expertise and experience.

Another ECOSTAT workshop conclusion was that sediment management is complex and thus we need to significantly invest in a better understanding of this complexity to be able to better inform river-sea managers and policy makers.

For more information contact Jos Brils

The report of the workshop is in prep., but the agenda and presentations are already publicly available at CIRCA website.


Emerging Contaminants

OVAM, the Public Waste Agency of Flanders, wishes to initiate an international multi-stakeholder network on Emerging Contaminants in Soil (EmConSoil), and more specific on the policy challenges of this theme.

The first focus of this network is on soil, but of course there is a very close relation with sediments. F.i. PFAS/PFOA is found in soils and sediments, and we need regulations to prevent that sediments, contaminated with PFAS/PFOA are reused as soil.

We all have to deal with the legacy of emerging contaminants, and as OVAM we really feel the urgent need for concerted actions and initiatives. It is clear that the problem cannot be solved by the regulatory authorities alone. In this network, OVAM aims to bring together policy makers, scientists, consultancies and problem owners.

EmConSoil will be an open network for all stakeholders from different sectors and countries. The aims are to exchange knowledge, to develop strategies and policies through co-creation, to raise awareness, and intensify collaboration between all stakeholders. This will be done by information sharing through a website, conferences, workshops, etc.

EmConSoil will work in close collaboration with other networks, like SedNet.

You can read more on https://www.ovamenglish.be/emconsoil and, if your organisation wishes to join this news network (it’s free!), do not hesitate to complete  the registration form.


Microplastics in sediments

GESAMP (the UN inter-agency body ‘the Group of Experts in the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection’ – www.gesamp.org) produced a couple of reports about microplastics in sediments:

  1. Sources, fate and effects of microplastics in the marine environment (Part 1)
  2. Sources, fate and effects of microplastics in the marine environment (Part 2)
  3. Guidelines for the monitoring and assessment of plastic litter in the oceans 

Besides covering the design of monitoring and assessment programmes, monitoring methods for shorelines, the sea surface, water column, seafloor and marine biota, the latter report includes recommendations for:

  • Definitions/terminology
  • sampling methods
  • sampling processing
  • physico-chemical characterization
  • analysis of chemicals associated with microplastics
  • biological characterization


Dramatic decrease of sediment in
Danube and Rhine

Dramatic sediment deficits have already been reported for e.g. the Mekong, Yellow River, Yangtze and Mississippi and their delta’s and coastal seas. However, very recent findings for the Danube and Rhine rivers show also dramatic figures for Europe:  60% reduction of suspended sediment input by the Danube to the Black Sea (Habersack, 2019) and 70% reduction of the suspended sediment load of the Rhine at is entry point in the Netherlands since 1952 (van der Perk et al., 2019). These figures (so for Rhine and Danube) only relate to suspended sediment, figures for bedload (gravel, sand, pebbles) are not yet readily available/insights/data are still hugely lacking. What are the impacts? We need to significantly advance the state-of-the-art in our integrated and holistic understanding of the societal, economic as well as ecological impacts resulting from a deficit of sediments in oceans, seas, coastal and inland waters. Hopefully Horizon Europe will provide a great opportunity for advancing of this understanding. Based on that understanding sustainable (nature-based) solutions can be proposed to restore and protect the flow of sediments from inland waters to seas and oceans in Europe as well as globally.

 

References:


Implementing Measures for Sustainable Estuaries

IMMERSE, or “Implementing Measures for Sustainable Estuaries,” aims to accelerate the implementation of large-scale measures that address multiple estuary management challenges, while increasing their cost-efficiency and enhancing stakeholder commitment. More information is available on the project website.

In order to advance development and transfer of solutions across estuaries in the North Sea Region, IMMERSE is organizing its first Transnational Exchange Lab on 12 – 13 June, 2019 in Gothenburg, Sweden. The interactive workshop is designed to support the project’s objective of improving the quality of estuary management measures by drawing from transnational knowledge and experiences. The 1st Transnational Exchange Lab will focus on sediment management, including innovative treatment methods of contaminated sediments from the Port of Gothenburg, flood protection and governance issues. Please see the draft programme here. 

At the Exchange Lab, IMMERSE partners, North Sea Region estuary managers and relevant stakeholders will explore solutions and share experiences through a variety of discussion formats. We invite SedNet members to join us at the Exchange Lab to share your experiences and expertise.

More information, including registration and travel information, is available on the event page.


Interreg EU Green Week

From 13-17 May 2019 the EU Green Week took place. Please find here a link to a special publication prepared for  this event; there are a couple of sediment-related projects in it.
The purpose of the publication is to showcase a small sample of Interreg-funded projects that are putting EU environmental laws and policies into practice.


Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure

CEDA-IADC recently published its book Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure. The book gives state-of-the-art guidance on how to design, implement and manage a water infrastructure project with a dredging component in a sustainable manner.
Presented insights result from a wealth of up-to-date knowledge pooled by a team of scientists and practicing industry experts which was moderated by an Editorial Board comprised of CEDA and IADC representatives. Containing contributions from leading specialists in the field, the publication will serve as an authoritative guide to delivering dredging projects that enhance the natural and socio-economic systems.
Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure is available for € 150 (excluding VAT and shipping costs). CEDA and IADC members get 25% discount.
Learn more about the book


Upcoming events

 26-30 May 2019: 29th SETAC Europe Annual Meeting, Helsinki, Finland. Website

27-31 May 2019: Coastal Sediments ’19, Tampa/St. Pete, Florida, USA.
Conference theme “Advancing Science & Engineering for Resilient Coastal Systems”.
Optional Short Courses will be offered in full-day format on May 27, 2019.
Optional Technical Tours will be offered in full-and half-day formats on May 31, 2019.
Website

12-13 June 2019: 1st Knowledge exchange on sediment management – IMMERSE project, Gothenburg, Sweden. Website

17-20 June 2019: 17th EUROPE-INBO 2019 International Conference for the Implementation of the European Water Directives, Lahti, Finland. Website

29 July – 2 August 2019: Course Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design, Logan, Utah, USA.
Website

12-16 August 2019: Introductory course Geomorphic and Ecological Fundamentals for River and Stream Restoration”, Truckee, California USA.
For further details here. Early-bird registration through 31 May; online registration form here.

9-13 September 2019: 34th IAS meeting of Sedimentology, Rome, Italy.
Many interesting sessions, for instance Session 10.7 “Managing Coastal Sediment”.
Deadline for submission of abstracts is 30 March 2019.
Website

16-19 September 2019: 14th International Symposium on River Sedimentation (14th ISRS), Chengdu, China. The Symposium will be held with the theme of “Integrated Sediment Management in Rivers and Coasts”.
Website

3-5 October 2019: International workshop Metrology for the Sea (MetroSea 2019), Genova, Italy. Website

20-24 October 2019: 22nd International Riversymposium on ‘Resilient Rivers’, Brisbane, Australia.
Website

23-24 October 2019: 3rd meeting SedNet Working Group Sediments in Circular Economy, incl. site visit. Bremen, Germany and Delfzijl, NL. Further info via SedNet Secretariat.

7-8 November 2019: CEDA Dredging Days 2019, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Website

20-21 November 2019: Kick-off meeting SedNet WG on Sediment Management Concepts & Education-Science-Policy Interfacing, Madrid, Spain. If you wish to get involved please contact the SedNet Secretariat.

7-10 July 2020: RIVER FLOW 2020, Delft, The Netherlands.
10th Conference on Fluvial Hydraulics under the auspices of IAHR, with masterclasses on the 6th of July.
The deadline for abstract submission is 15 August 2019.
The conference themes include: sediment transport, sediment mining, climate adaptation, morphodynamics, ecosystem services etc.
Find updates or subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.riverflow2020.nl.

 

Disseminated by:

SedNet secretariat:

Mrs. Marjan Euser
Deltares
P.O. Box 85467
NL-3508 AL Utrecht
The Netherlands

Email  marjan.euser@deltares.nl

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SedNet Conference 2019 – Poster Presentations

11th International SedNet conference, 3-5 April 2019, Dubrovnik, Croatia:
Sediment as a dynamic natural resource – from catchment to open sea

ABSTRACTS AND FLASH PRESENTATIONS OF POSTERS:


Posters “Sediment Management Concept and Sediment Policy”
1 Laboratory study of in-situ capping polluted fibrous sediments
Alizée Lehoux, Uppsala University, Sweden
Abstract
2 Sustainable Sediment Management: Whose values are we sustaining?
Sabine Apitz, SEA Environmental Decisions Ltd., UK
Abstract
3 Monitoring the strength development of mud layers in ports and waterways
Alex Kirichek, Delft University of Technology / Deltares, NL
Abstract
4 Rheological characterization of fluid mud  in ports and waterways
Alex Kirichek, Delft University of Technology / Deltares, NL
Abstract
5 Prediction of sediment gas production from sediment properties
Julia Gebert, Delft University of Technology, NL
Abstract
6 Spatial and temporal variability of the biological activity of tidal Elbe sediments in the Port of Hamburg
Florian Zander, Delft University of Technology, NL
Abstract
7 Sustainable sediment management in coastal infrastructures through an innovative technology: the MARINAPLAN PLUS LIFE project
Marco Pellegrini, University of Bologna, Italy
Abstract

Posters “The Impact and Transport of Microplastics”
8 Microplastics in lacustrine sediments – the example of Lake Biel, Switzerland
Georg Reifferscheid, Federal Institute of Hydrology, Germany
Abstract
9 Plastics pollution from placement of blasted rock masses in the sea
Jens Laugesen, Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Norway
Abstract
10 The interaction between microplastics and suspended particulate matter
Arjan Wijdeveld, Deltares, NL
Abstract
11 The sinking behavior of microplastic and their presence in various benthic and coastal environments
Anita Whitlock Nybakk, Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Norway
Abstract
12 Determination of microplastics in River sediments on the example of Vistula tributaries near Krakow (Poland)
Marzena Połeć, AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland
Abstract

Posters “Circular Economy – Sediment as a Resource”
13 The European Interreg Maritime Project “SEDITERRA”. From waste to resource: mycoremediation of contaminated marine sediments.
Marco Capello, University of Genoa – DISTAV, Italy
Abstract
14 Reallocation of sediment within the harbor, part of a green port strategy
Arjan Wijdeveld, Deltares, NL
Abstract
15 Reuse of a dredged fluvial sediment from Wallonia as partial replacement of sand in concrete for a cycle path
Claire Alary, IMT Lille – Douai, France
Abstract
16 Mineral based sustainable dewatering solution
Ruben Molina, Clariant, Spain
Abstract
17 Testing of heavy metals recovery from dredged sediments
Laura Ferrans, Linnaeus University, Sweden
Abstract
18 Electrokinetic remediation of heavy metals from a contaminated marine dredged sediment from a European port
Nieves García de Blas, Institute of Construction Science Eduardo Torroja (IETcc-CSIC), Spain
Abstract

Posters “Sediment Quality Guidance, Sediment Quality Assessment”

19 Element geochemistry as a tool for determining the suspended particulate matter (SPM) pollution sources in the Sava River headwaters
Mavro Lučić, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Croatia
Abstract
20 Environmental quality assessment of sediments settled in an artificial lake, the case of Ridracoli Lake
Simone Toller, University of Bologna, Italy
Abstract
21 Long term monitoring of marina Punat
Marinka Kutle, Association LijepaNaša, Croatia
Abstract
22 Sediment at the sinking site of the ancient ship (Gnalić, Biograd na Moru, Croatia) as a centuries-old mercury source in the marine environment
Vlado Cuculić, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Croatia
Abstract
23 The usefulness of bioassays for sediment quality assessment – A question of reproducibility, uncertainty and interpretation
Susanne Heise, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany
Abstract
24 Common barbel (Barbus barbus) as a bioindicator of river sediment pollution with metals
Arian Morina, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Abstract
25 Assessment of heavy metals pollution in surface sediment of the Montenegro coastline
Danijela Joksimović, University of Montenegro, Montenegro
Abstract
26 Calcium in sediments of the transitional river-lagoon-marine system as indicator of different biogeochemical accumulation areas
Sergej Suzdalev, Klaipeda University, Lithuania
Abstract
27 Assessing the status quo of the sediment quality in the Lahn River
Alexandra Brinke, Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Germany
Abstract
28 Progress in the harmonization of sediment sampling and pretreatment protocols for sediment quality assessment in Switzerland
Carmen Casado Martinez, Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology EAWAG-EPFL, Switzerland
Abstract
29 Study of phenomena responsible for organic contaminants mobilization within the framework of harbor sediment dredging
Gisèle Usanase, Université Montpellier Alès, France
Abstract
30 Assessing the bioavailability of metals in natural sediments by DGT passive sampling and bioaccumulation
Hanne Hetjens, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Abstract
31 Assessment of sediment quality using different pollution indicators and statistical analyses: Begej Canal (Serbia-Romania)
Srdjan Rončević, University of Novi Sad, Serbia
Abstract
32 In situ electrokinetic treatment pilot test of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated marine sediment
Ossi Tonteri, Finnish Environment Institute, Finland
Abstract
33 Benthic macroinvertebrate indicators for the sediment quality triad assessment of the Scheldt Estuary
Kristine De Schamphelaere, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Abstract
34 Ecological risk assessment of chromium in sediments
Tayebeh Bashnin, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Abstract
35 Monitoring the characteristics of suspended sediment in river systems using multiple sensor devices
Stefan Vollmer, Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Germany
Abstract
36 The use of bioassays for an assessment of ecological risk in contaminated bottom sediments
Agnieszka Baran, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Abstract
37 The effect of organic matter content on PCDDs/PCDFs in bottom sediments
Agnieszka Baran, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Abstract
38 Reducing uncertainty in sediment contact testing by considering natural variability and harmonizing control sediments
Susanne Heise, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany
Abstract
39 Evaluation of elemental composition of sediments from the Adriatic Sea: Underground military harbors
Andrija Vinkovic, Ruder Boškovic Institute, Croatia
Abstract
40 Physico-chemical and ecotoxicological evaluation of the Rovinj costal area sediments, NE Adriatic Sea, Croatia
Bojan Hamer, Ruder Boškovic Institute, Croatia
Abstract
41 Characterization and spatial distribution of organic contaminated sediment from historical industrial effluents to inform remediation decisions
Tony Walker, Dalhousie University, Canada
Abstract

Poster “Climate Change and
Sediments: Direct and Indirect Consequences
42 Shifting sedimentation patterns in the Curonian Lagoon under climate change
Jovita Mėžinė, Klaipeda University, Lithuania
Abstract

Posters “How can Sediment Management influence Ecosystem Services Provision?”
43 Active Nautical Depth: a promising method to manage harbour sediment with the potential of tributyltin bioremediation
Amélie Polrot, Liverpool John Moores University, UK
Abstract
44 Applying ecosystem services for waterborne transport infrastructure projects: progress report
Sabine Apitz, SEA Environmental Decisions Ltd., UK
Abstract
45 The change of benthic molluscs biodiversity in the Neretva river estuary (Adriatic Sea) in a decade
Ana Bratoš Cetinić, University of Dubrovnik, Croatia
Abstract
46 Contamination of Kristianstad biosphere reservoir by metal bound sediments
Sina Shahabi, Linnaeus University, Sweden
Abstract

Posters “Nuclear and Isotopic Analytical Techniques in Sediment Analysis”
47 The importance of correction factors for the measurement of some radionuclides in sediment, seaweed and sand samples by HPGe detector
Haluk Yücel, Ankara University, Turkey
Abstract
48 Using environment tracers for investigation of submarine groundwater discharge
George Melikadze, Tbilisi State University, Georgia
Abstract
49 The use of 7Be, 137Cs and 210Pb in the evaluation of the contemporary and medium term sediment deposition on the Meric River floodplains
Ilker Sert, Ege University, Turkey
Abstract
50 Analysis of carbon in sediments using FNAA
Jasmina Obhodas, Ruder Boškovic Institute, Croatia
Abstract
51 Metal pollution assessment in sediments of the Bulgarian Black Sea coastal zone
Krasimira Slavova, Institute of Oceanology – BAS, Bulgaria
Abstract

Posters “
Impacts of Disturbed Sediment Continua and Mitigation Measures
52 Modeling morphological changes in the river bed using 1D and 2D models – Case study: Željeznica River (Sarajevo, B&H)
Nerma Lazović, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Abstract
53 Local Impact of an integrated policy for sedimentary and ecological continuity restoration on Gomphidae habitat: the Loire River Example
Grégoire Maillet, University of Angers, France
Abstract
54 Evolution of dredging on the Rhône River
Sylvain Reynaud, Compagnie Nationale du Rhône, France
Abstract

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Newsletter – May 2018

Website: www.SedNet.org
Compiled by: Marjan Euser (marjan.euser@deltares.nl)
Subscription Service: SedNet Secretariat (marjan.euser@deltares.nl)
Disclaimer: SedNet is not responsible for faults due to incorrectness of info in this newsletter
Previous issues: www.sednet.org/newsletter

Contents

  • Call for Abstracts – 11th International SedNet Conference
  • Workshop SedNet Working Group Sediment Quantity
  • Sediments and Circular Economy, a question of Good Practice too
  • Sediment Budget of the Rhine River from source to mouth 1991 – 2010
  • InterReg project VALSE sampling historic sediments for pilot reuse projects
  • World Resources Forum: Call for deep-dive workshops
  • Shortcourses in integrated science for river management and restoration, specialized training in sediment transport as applied to river restoration
  • Net erosion and sediment transport using WaTEM/SEDEM
  • Upcoming events

 

 

Call for Abstracts – 11th International SedNet Conference

From 3-5 April 2019 the 11th International SedNet Conference Sediment as a dynamic natural resource – from catchment to open sea will be organised in Dubrovnik, Croatia. Co-organisers are Ruđer Bošković Institute and University of Dubrovnik, and IAEA is giving support.

Sediments found in upland streams, industrialised waterways, busy coastal zones and offshore waters are characterized by a wide variety of sediment properties present in dynamic and less dynamic areas. These areas are inherently interlinked as sediment is transported from catchment to the open sea. The natural flow of sediment from mountainous regions to the ocean is strongly impacted by anthropogenic activities along this journey in terms of both the quantity that is transported and the quality of transporting waters. Sediment distribution is not only impacted by direct human influence but also indirectly as a result of changing weather and climate patterns. A change in sediment dynamics leading to sediment starvation or sediment accumulation is often the concern of river basin and coastal managers who constantly need to adapt to these environmental variations. Historical or emerging contaminants may also hinder the management of these areas.

At the SedNet 2019 conference “Sediment as a dynamic natural resource – from catchment to open sea”, we invite abstracts for a series of sessions aiming to explore these challenges and proposed solutions. This includes how policies and plans are developed for the range of often interlinked issues experienced along the journey from upland areas to the deeper waters such as how sediment quality should be assessed, sediment as an ecosystem service and how excess sediment can be used beneficially. The challenges posed as a result of anthropogenic influences, resource exploitation and climate change shall also be explored as well as emerging problems being examined such as contaminants resulting from discharge of waste.

The proposed thematic sessions are:

  1. Sediment management concept and sediment policy
  2. Sediment quality guidance, sediment quality assessment
  3. How can sediment management influence ecosystem services provision?
  4. Climate change and sediments: direct and indirect consequences
  5. Circular economy – sediment as a resource
  6. Societal impacts of disturbed sediment continua and mitigation measures?
  7. The impact and transport of microplastics
  8. Ballast water and sediments – BWM Convention
  9. Deep sea sediments
  10. Nuclear and isotopic analytical techniques in sediment analysis

Deadline for submission of abstracts:  1 October 2018

Abstracts will be selected by the SedNet Steering Group for either a platform presentation or a poster presentation.

Please see https://sednet.org/sednet-conference-2019/  for the full text of the Call and the template for submission of abstracts to the SedNet Secretariat: marjan.euser@deltares.nl

 

 

Workshop SedNet Working Group Sediment Quantity

On 7-8 March 2018 a workshop of the SedNet Working Group Sediment Quantity was organised at Deltares in Delft. Approx. 25 participants attended the workshop. For background information about the WG we refer to the February-2018 edition of SedNet eNews.

The result of the event is a variety of practicle and feasible ideas and actions:

  • Produce a document as input to the discussion of WG Ecostat about a guidance document for measures to restore hydromorphology in heavily modified water bodies in order to achieve good ecological status.
  • Further develop the working document of WG Quantity: add cases, visualize problems (with graphics, pictures).
  • Write publication for an international magazine about disturbed sediment balances in large, global rivers.
  • Start building a FP9-consortium in order to be prepared the moment DG ENV publishes a relevant Call (in the next couple of years).

 

 

The Working Group is chaired by:
Helmut Habersack (BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna) and Ad van der Spek (Deltares).

The next workshop will be held on 5-6 November 2018 in Hamburg, Germany.

If you are interested in getting involved, feel free to contact the SedNet Secretariat.

 

 

Sediments and Circular Economy, a question of Good Practice too

In order to promote the reuse of sediments for sustainable purposes, SedNet will open on its website a resources library containing good practice guides, and more. Three such guides exist in French and we wish to translate them in English.
If you are interested in collaborating, let us know (SedNet Secretariat).
Summer scholarships may be offered to students willing to learn through translating (native English or bilingual, fluent French, add your CV).
A SedNet Working Group is now dedicated to Sediments and Circular Economy. It will have its first session in Hamburg, Germany, November 6th. Keep the date and drop us a line (SedNet Secretariat) if you are interested.  See you in Hamburg!

 

 

Sediment Budget of the Rhine River from source to mouth for the period 1991 – 2010

The EU Water Framework Directive promotes a holistic, transboundary approach to European river catchments. The Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) and the Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management of RWTH Aachen University (IWW) have compiled the first sediment budget of the entire Rhine channel from its source in the Alps to its estuary in the North Sea. The study was conducted under the banner of the International Commission for the Hydrology of the Rhine Basin (CHR) and is now published as the 22nd CHR-report.

Schematic representation of the sediment budget terms of a river section.

The report presents a unique, detailed, and grain size fractionated analysis of the morphology of the entire river Rhine, one of the world’s larger rivers. The objectives were: (a) to quantify the downstream fluxes of clay, silt, sand, gravel and cobbles and (b) to identify the sources and sinks of these sediments. A large number of morphological studies about the Rhine were reviewed and existing data, such as echo soundings and sediment transport data from the period 1991 to 2010, was re-analysed.

The following conclusions were drawn: (1) Sediment fluxes in the Rhine are discontinuous due to regional sinks and sources, leading to a large variability of the sediment fluxes along the river channel. (2) From source to mouth, the Rhine traverses four sections with fundamentally different morphodynamic behaviour: the Alpine, impounded, free-flowing and delta sections. (3) The largest sediment fluxes, which are dominated by the clay fraction, are observed in the Alpine section. (4) Nourishment represents the biggest source of gravel and cobbles, while tributaries are the biggest fluvial source of clay, silt and sand. In addition large amounts of clay, silt and sand are supplied to the lower Rhine delta by the sea. (5) Dredging represents a main sediment sink for all size fractions. For silt and clay, deposition in floodplains and ports represent an additional major sediment sink. Sediment output to the North Sea is limited. (6) In contrast to the typical prototype of a river with erosion in the upper reaches and sedimentation in the lower reaches, the Rhine has net deposition in the upper reaches and net erosion in the downstream reaches. Local variations are high though. (7) More sediment is transported upstream from the North Sea into the lower Rhine delta than vice versa. (8) Floodplain deposition causes a higher loss of sediment in the upstream parts of the river than in the delta. (9) Today’s sediment fluxes in the Rhine are strongly influenced by river training works from the past, as well as by dredging and nourishment operations. (10) Yet natural factors determine the large-scale, primary location of the main sedimentation areas. (11) In many reaches gravel is deposited, whereas sand is being eroded simultaneously. (12) The budget analysis shows that sediment dynamics in rivers are much higher than is suggested by echosoundings or transport measurements, and it also shows that (13) sand plays a dominant role in the morphodynamics of the Rhine, not only in the sand-bed reaches, but also in the gravel-bed reaches of the river. (14) The sediment budget derived in this study provides very valuable empirical evidence for improving numerical prediction models, optimizing nourishment, dredging and monitoring strategies, and for discovering knowledge gaps and setting research agendas to facilitate the cross-boundary and sustainable sediment management along the river Rhine.

The full report is available at: http://doi.bafg.de/BfG/2017/KHR_22.2017.pdf

 

InterReg project VALSE sampling historic sediments for pilot reuse projects

avec le soutien du fonds européen de développement régional
met steun van het Europees Fonds voor Regionale Ontwikkeling
program financed by the European Regional Development Fund 

Project partners INERIS, Lille University, VNF, BRGM led in March 2018 a characterisation and sampling campaign on the historic sediments storage site TD 26 operated by VNF (French Waterways Agency) near Saint Omer, Northern France, along the channelised Aa river. Laboratory support is provided by Belgian partners ISSeP and CTP, and French partner Mines Douai.

The objective of this campaign is to evaluate historic dredged sediments for their suitability for reuse through pilot projects (civil engineering and road works concrete, cycle path base, landscaping mounds) that will be undertaken during the project. It focussed on potential environmental issues and on site homogeneity. It addressed both solids (matured sediments) and shallow water.

 

 

 

Map of Pb concentrations (mg/kg on wet material) measured by portable XRF (no Pb < 20). Note the higher values in the NW part (older) of the site. The only other elements of concern detected by pXRF (Zn, Cr) show a similar pattern.

 

Results show that the sediments would qualify as non hazardous or inert under waste regulations for most regulated metals and metalloids. Organic contaminants will be analysed in the laboratory. The campaign allowed testing new on-site electrochemical analytical techniques (trace elements in water, sulphides).
The VALSE project aims at developing a toolbox of on-site technologies for sediment management decision making.
TD 26 sediments are suitable for pilot testing and further developments will be presented in this newsletter.
https://valse.info/le-projet/

 

 

World Resources Forum: Call for deep-dive workshops

WRF 2019 will host a series of ‘deep-dive’ workshops as part of the conference program and invites interested organisations to design and submit a workshop proposal. Under the Title ‘Closing Loops – Transitions at work’, WRF 2019 wants to show systemic drivers, as well as concrete solutions to make the transition to circular economy work in practice.

A circular economy aims at maintaining our resources, such as materials, land and soil, at a high quality level while rendering the services we need to fulfill our current and future needs. This can be achieved by reorganising production/consumption patterns and value chains so that resources do not get wasted, rather get replenished and restored.

Workshops address topical issues related to the 6 conference themes:

  1. Cities and regions as laboratories for change
  2. Ports and circular economy in a global market
  3. Digital technology as driver for circular economy
  4. Sustainable materials and waste management
  5. Circular bio-economy and bio-based materials
  6. Land and soil (and sediments) as valuable resources

For further information see: http://www.ovamenglish.be/design-your-own-workshop and http://www.ovamenglish.be/soil-and-land-as-a-valuable-resource

 

 

Shortcourses in integrated science for river management and restoration, specialized training in sediment transport as applied to river restoration 

River Restoration: Fluvial-Geomorphic and Ecological Tools, 11-15 June 2018, Beaumont du Ventoux, Provence, France
https://institutbeaumont.org
This shortcourse/workshop emphasizes understanding geomorphic process as a sound basis for planning and designing river restoration projects and programs, with specific applications and field visits to Mediterranean and mountain environments.  The course draws on innovative process-based river restoration and management experiences in France and elsewhere in the EU, complemented by experiences in North America.  Instruction includes lectures, field exercises, and workshops on approaches to planning and implementing process-based restoration.  Instructors are drawn from multiple disciplines, and from academia and practice, on both sides of the Atlantic. It’s a great opportunity to make connections with others working on similar issues in different geographic and institutional settings.  Held the week after ISRivers, it offers a great opportunity to combine two professional and education experiences in a compelling setting.  (in English)

Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design, 30 July – 03 Aug  2018, Logan, Utah USA
https://qcnr.usu.edu/courses/sediment_transport
This course is intended for those who wish to understand and apply the principles of sediment transport to alluvial channel assessment and design. Principles of open channel flow and sediment transport are combined with watershed-scale, hydrologic and sediment source analysis to place channel assessment and design in context. The course balances advance reading, lecture, field work, and hands-on exercises for estimating sediment supply, calculating sediment transport rates, forecasting channel response to water and sediment supply, and channel design. Intended for participants familiar with basic principles of river geomorphology (such as from the Beaumont or Sagehen courses). Instructors are drawn from both research and practice. Continuing Education Units for the course offered by Utah State University.

Geomorphic and Ecological Fundamentals for River and Stream Restoration, 6-10 August 2018, Truckee, California USA
http://laep.ced.berkeley.edu/courses/riverrestoration
This five-day introductory course emphasizes understanding geomorphic and ecological process as a sound basis for planning and designing river restoration, covering general principles and case studies from a wide range of environments, and includes field measurements, mapping, interpretation, field trips to the Truckee River and streams in the Lake Tahoe Basin, and workshops on stream restoration problems faced by participants. Now in its 24th successful year, the course is held at Sagehen Creek Field Station, combining a beautiful natural setting with excellent research and facilities, such as an outdoor classroom, stream table to demonstrate channel adjustments, on-site laboratory, and Sagehen Creek itself, with its rich history of research in fluvial geomorphology and ecology.  Instructors are drawn from multiple disciplines, and from both research and practice.

If you have questions, please contact us at <river.restoration.sagehen@gmail.com>

 

Net erosion and sediment transport using WaTEM/SEDEM

The JRC in collaboration with the University of Basel and the Universite Catholique de Louvain have quantified the potential spatial displacement and transport of soil sediments due to water erosion at European scale. Long-term averages of annual soil loss and deposition rates were computed by means of the extensively tested spatially distributed WaTEM/SEDEM model. According to a recent research study in Europe, the estimated sediment yield totals about 164 ± 13 Tg yr-1. The Sedi­ment Delivery Ratio (SDR) i.e., the ratio between sediment yield (SY) and gross erosion, indicates that the sediment routed down the hillslopes to the riverine system accounts for 15.3% of the total eroded soil. Further improvement of the calibration scheme in the model transport parameter is foreseen to better reconcile the good agreement between predicted and measured sediment yield. The net erosion and sediment transport data are available (100m resolution) in ESDAC.

 

Upcoming events

4-8 June 2018: 3rd edition of the I.S.Rivers international conference on integrative sciences and sustainable development of rivers, Lyon, France. See the conference website.

19-21 June 2018: 7th International Symposium “Monitoring of Mediterranean coastal Areas: problems and measurement techniques”, Livorno, Italy. Organised by the Institute of Biometeorology of the Italian National Research Council of Italy, in collaboration with other Research Institutes and University Departments. See the conference website.

6 November 2018: Kick-off meeting SedNet Working Group Sediments in Circular Economy, Hamburg, Germany
If you would like to be kept informed about the organisation and programme, please notify the SedNet Secretariat.

5-6 November 2018: Workshop SedNet Working Group Sediment Quantity, Hamburg, Germany.
If you wish to get involved, please send an email to the SedNet Secretariat.

19-20 November 2018: ENSOR – International workshop on Emerging policy challenges on New SOil contaminants, Brussels, Belgium.
Deadline for submitting abstracts: 15 June 2018
More info: https://www.2mpact.be/ensor

11-14 February 2019: 10th International BATTELLE Conference on Remediation and Management of Contaminated Sediments, New Orleans, Louisiana, US. Deadline for Abstract-submission: 29 June 2018.
See the conference website.

24-27 February 2019: World Resources Forum, Antwerp, Belgium. Under the Title ‘Closing Loops – Transitions at work’, WRF 2019 wants to show systemic drivers, as well as concrete solutions to make the transition to circular economy work in practice.
More info: http://www.ovamenglish.be/

3-5 April 2019: 11th International SedNet Conference “Sediment as a dynamic natural resource – from catchment to open sea”, Dubrovnik, Croatia. Co-organised by Ruđer Bošković Institute and University of Dubrovnik, with support of IAEA.
Call for Abstracts see https://sednet.org/sednet-conference-2019/
Deadline for submission of abstracts: 1 October 2018

26-30 May 2019: 29th SETAC Europe Annual Meeting, Helsinki, Finland.
Website: https://www.setac.org/?page=AnnualMeetings

 

 

 

Compiled by:

 

SedNet secretariat:

Mrs. Marjan Euser
Deltares
P.O. Box 85467
NL-3508 AL Utrecht
The Netherlands

Email marjan.euser@deltares.nl

 

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Call for Abstracts 28th SETAC Europe Annual Meeting

The Scientific Committee of the 28th SETAC Europe Annual Meeting in Rome (13-17 May 2018) has planned the session “Holistic Risk Assessment of Chemicals in Sediments and Soils Using Weight of Evidence Approaches”  (chairs: Sebastian Höss, Ute Feiler, Susanne Heise, Lucie Bielská) under  track 4: Ecological risk assessment and human health risk assessment of chemicals, mixtures and stressors and risk mitigation strategies). The description of the session can be found on the submission site: https://rome.setac.org/programme/scientific-programme/call-for-abstracts/

Deadline for abstract submission: Wednesday 29 November 2017.
Please note that for an oral presentation you must submit an extended abstract.

 

 

 

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